A Reply

This morning S asked me to find an online copy of Atlas Shrugged and it wasn’t tough to find one. He was interested in a particular section and when he sent the extract over, my mind felt refreshed!

  • I remembered why I love her writing so much.
  • I fell in love with Ayn Rand once again.
  • I could verbalise one of the reasons why I left Infosys.
  • I remembered those moments when I felt lonely at work.
  • I realised how much I hate mediocrity.

So here goes the extract from Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged –

Miss Taggart, do you know the hallmark of the second-rater? It’s resentment of another man’s achievement. Those touchy mediocrities who sit trembling lest someone’s work prove greater than their own—they have no inkling of the loneliness that comes when you reach the top. The loneliness for an equal— for a mind to respect and an achievement to admire. They bare their teeth at you from out of their rat holes, thinking that you take pleasure in letting your brilliance dim them—while you’d give a year of your life to see a flicker of talent anywhere among them. They envy achievement, and their dream of greatness is a world where all men have become their acknowledged inferiors. They don’t know that that dream is the infallible proof of mediocrity, because that sort of world is what the man of achievement would not be able to bear. They have no way of knowing what he feels when surrounded by inferiors—hatred? no, not hatred, but boredom the terrible, hopeless, draining, paralyzing boredom. Of what account are praise and adulation from men whom you don’t respect? Have you ever felt the longing for someone you could admire? For something, not to look down at, but up to?

PS: The post is dedicated to S who sent it and ‘S2‘ whom I love and look up to and admire. Also to all those whom I respect.

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2 States – The story of my marriage

Finally Chetan Bhagat came close to what he had created with FPS!

Yes, 2 States is a much better book when compared to Bhagat’s previous attempts post FPS. The book  has a certain element of suspense, adventure, twists and fun. Light reading as ever, Bhagat’s style was written all over it.

The characters are identifiable to common man and situations, in most cases, very likely to happen in reality. Krish, our hero is an IIM A pass out and his heroine Ananya is an intelligent ‘Tamilian’ not a Madrasi also his batch mate at IIM A. The best part about this book was the way Bhagat describes the cultural disparities between a Punjabi and a Tamilian family. Their reactions are so typical and for someone who has seen both Punjabis and Tamilians from close quarters can identify with and enjoy thoroughly.

The story’s end is predictable, but the way things come about and the reactions of various characters is what makes the book fun – the typical loud Punjabis vis-a-vis the quiet Tamilians. I always felt that marrying someone from a different state wouldn’t go down easily with parents and this trauma is very well described in the book. Parents are never ready to accept someone who is from a different community and especially someone whom the child chooses. It is but understandable from their end, but makes it tough for the children. A certain degree of ‘arranged marriage’ stuff needs to be there in the marriage for them to feel good. Moreover, in India, it is not two individuals marrying, it is their families and a match of their status in the society. So the book talks about all this and more in a nice manner.  I felt that the physical relation between the couple, prior to the marriage, has become common, but my parents’ generation would not be ready to accept it.

I always felt that one could enjoy a book much more when one can readily identify with it and that is what Bhagat is so good at. No wonder his books sell like hot cakes. So pick your copy or download it and breeze through it –  a fun read.

PS: One thing for sure that all the North Indians ought to realise is that there are four main states in the South of India and not all south Indians are ‘Madrasis’ and the language they speak is not ‘Madrasi’. It can be Telugu, Tamil, Kanada or Malyalam, at the least. (This message comes out partially in the book and I wanted to emphasize this for the Northies.)

Ibn-E-Batuta ta ta ta. . .

Peppy, yummy, uplifting – that’s Ibn-e-batuta for you.

I don’t think I have enjoyed listening to any other song more than this in the recent past. Just love the beats and music in this song. Totally happy, especially for someone in my current situation. Loved all the songs of Ishqiya and highly recommended to anyone who enjoys good music and lyrics.

Lyrics – Courtesy http://www.indicine.com/movies/bollywood/ibn-e-batuta-lyrics-ishqiya/

Ibn-e-batuta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ..

Ibn-e-batuta ta ta
Bagal mein joota ta ta
Ibn-e-batuta ta ta
Bagal mein joota ta ta
Pehne to karta hai churrr
Udh udh aave aa aa, daana chugey aa aa
Udh udh aave aa aa, daana chugey aa aa
Udh jaave chidiya phurrr

Ibn-e-batuta ta ta, bagal mein joota ta ta
Pehne to karta hai churrr
Udh udh gaave, daana chugey ye
Udh jaave chidiya phurrr
Phurrrrrrr ..

Ibn-e-batuta

Ibn-e-batuta

Yeehehh Agley mod pe, maut khadi hai
Arey marne ki bhi, kya jaldi hai

Ibn-e-batuta

Agley mod pe, maut khadi hai
Arey marne ki bhi haiii kya jaldi hai
Horn bajake, aawat janme
Hoo durghatna se, dher baji hai
Chal udh ja udh ja phurrr phurrr
Ibn-e-batuta ta ta
Bagal mein joota ta ta
Pehne to karta hai churrr
Udh udh aave aa aa , daana chugey aa aa
Udh jaave chidiya phurrr

Ibn-eeeeeeeee-batuta

Ibn-eeeeeeeee-batuta

Dono taraf se, bajthi hai ye
Aaye hai zindagi, kya dholak hai

Dono taraf se, bajti hai ye
Aaye hai zindagi, kya dholak hai
Horn bajake, aa bagian mein
Arrey thoda aa gaye, ghajro datt hai
Arrey chal chal chal udh ja udh ja
Phurrr, phurrr, phurrr

Ibn-e-batuta ta ta
(Ibn-e-batuta ta ta)
Bagal mein joota ta ta
(Bagal mein joota ta ta)
Pehne to karta hai churrr
Udh udh aave aa aa
(Udh udh aave aa aa)
Daana chugey aa aa
Udh jaave chidiya phurrr